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if we had a little more that in washington, d.c. today and a little less of what we have. >> what do we have now? >> and overgrown city with too many politicians and lobbyists and consultants and media. seven out of the 10 richest counties in the united states, metropolitan washington, is the capital that cannot produce. it is the country that is still great with capital that is not. >> who in 1775 whatever predicted this? >> i suspect some of them were pretty cynical about politics. if you ever had an idea there would be a country of 300 million people with a capital that would have its finger on everything in the world, they might have been able to come up with a little pcynicism about that. >> said during the last years of the campaign of 2012, you started. >> the first time i did something like that was in the 1990's. i wrote a book about the english-speaking civil wars. the english revolution, the american revolution, and the american civil war. i did that because i cannot stand the idea of thinking about it bill clinton and newt gingrich too much. nice to take a vacation from thos
, metropolitan washington, it is the country did is still great but a capital that is not. would have predicted that? >> if anyone would have guessed that there would be a country of 300 million people, they may wouldn't come up with a bit of cynicism. but they were dedicated people. >> you say, during the last four years, during the campaign of 2012, you stuck your nose at this. >> the first time i did something like that was back in the 1990's. i wrote a book about the english speaking civil wars, the american revolution. i did it thinking about bill clinton and newt gingrich. it was nice to take a vacation from those guys. when i ran out of gas writing books about politics and economics, which i did a number of between 2002 and 2008, and said it is time to go back in history again. hop in my time capsule and forget about these fellows. and i have forgotten about them pretty well. i cannot remember, for example, the name of the governor of texas who was such a jerk in the primary. [laughter] effect that he could not remember the departments in the government, i guess it is a little forgivable
: money and guns continued to dominate the conversation here in washington this holiday season, and we will focus on both of those issues this morning. yesterday, press conferences on the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> republicans continue to work to avoid the fiscal cliff. $1.30 trillion in revenues, $850 billion in spending reductions fails to meet the test that the president promised the american people as a balanced approach. i hope the president will get serious about working with us on a balanced approach. tomorrow, the house will pass legislation to make permanent tax relief for nearly every american. 99.81% of the american people. the president can call on senate democrats to pass that bill, or he can be responsible for the largest tax increase in american history. host: joining us by phone is susan ferrechio, chief congressional correspondent for the "washington examiner." if 51-second press conference. guest: there have been press occurrences in the past where the speaker has come out and made a brief statement and not answer questions. to come out and say we are going to pass
again, most of washington says thank goodness. \[laughter] but i'm excited about what's going on today. the only thing or one of the few things i worried about when i was considering leaving the senate was who would replace me, because i knew governor haley would put someone in this seat that we would all be proud of and would continue to stand for those principles of freedom and opportunity that i've worked on while i was in the senate. so governor, thank you for your faithfulness to our cause and for your good judgment. and tim, i could not be happier today. and i appreciate the compliments. but i can walk away from the senate knowing that someone is in this seat that is better than i am, that will carry that voice of opportunity conservativism to the whole country in a way that i couldn't do. i'm going to keep working for that cause, but i can tell you, tim, you've inspired me since the first time i heard you speak in public. and our country needs those positive, optimistic voices right now to encourage people that there is a way out of this quagmire we're in in washington. you've g
, what happens next? "the washington times" says the collapse of plan b is a disaster for john boehner. an embarrassing setback for the republicans. "the wall street journal" says there are questions for john boehner to lead his party in further negotiations. 10 days before the looming fiscal cliff. this morning we will be taking your calls and comments. we will sort through what happens next. the phone lines are open. send us an e-mail, a facebook comment, or a tweet. let's look at the headlines from "the new york times." a similar headline this morning from "the washington post." maynard dropped the effort to avert the fiscal cliff. -- the john boehner drops the effort to avert the fiscal cliff. this from "the washington -- the wall street journal." the deadline looms with the fiscal cliff, that story available on line. joining us live, meredith who has been following this since it started. what happened to the caucus last night? caller: there is the surface answer, what happened when they were leaving the room. i think the most telling detail and what you have seen and the most outl
if taxes go up in 2013. host: flags all around washington, d.c. are at half staff this morning like the one you are feeling on the capital. good morning and welcome to "washington journal." for the first hour we will be talking about the aftermath of the shooting of in newtown, conn that happened yesterday. we will talk about the actions of the teachers. we will get into discussion about gun-control. that always seems to come up after situations like this. we would like for you to get involved in the conversation. the numbers are on the screen. we want to hear from teachers and people who work in the classrooms, principals and vice principals, people connected with education to find your thoughts on what happened yesterday. the actions of the teachers. how safe are in america's schools and america's schoolchildren. this is how the story is being played this morning on the front page of the "new york daily news." this is the way it is being reported this morning in "the wall street journal." the president talked about the shootings at the elementary school calling it a hate crime and vowing
in this morning's baltimore sun reflects those across the country. from the tribune's washington magazine, it's said when he weight in friday he delivered a lashing speech that included violent movies and video games as he said his plan would train those to guard our schools. in this edition of today's program, we're going to begin the first 45 minutes of the program to talk about the nra's response to the shootings. they broke their silence yesterday with executive director and vice president wayne. we'll talk more about what he had to say. but we want to get you involved in the conversation. so the numbers on your screen. guest: we also have a special line this morning for members of the n.r.a. (202)585-3883 this is for n.r.a. members. you can also reach out to us at twitter.com/cspanwj and f.s.a. -- and facebook at and the headline face of the n.r.a. mountains a forceful defense advocate of armed school guards excels at lighting fires under supporters and critics alike. guest: we'll get back to more of the newspaper articles this morning regarding the n.r.a.'s response to the newtown shoot
sequestration of the states. "washington >> mr. president, i rise with real heavy starter. our friend dan just died. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org--] >> a democrat of hawaii, a highly decorated wofford war two combat veteran and the second longest senator in history died on monday. the senate passed a resolution naming patrick leahy as new president pro temps, the third in line to the presidency. good morning, everyone, on this tuesday, december 18, 2012, as senators say goodbye to their longtime colleague yesterday, they will be welcoming a new senator from the state of south carolina. and tim scott has been tapped to replace jim demint. and the papers reporting progress being made about the so-called fiscal cliff talk. first, we return to the tragedy to discuss mental health issue in this country. what should be the role of the federal and state government if any in mental health? also send us a tweet, twitter.com c-spanwj or facebook .com/c-span
's foreign relations and what's next for president morrissey. washington redskins -- ♪ host: is this sunday, december 16, 2012. the flag over the u.s. capitol, over the white house, and in many locations across the country are at half staff today because of friday's school shooting in newtown, conn.. the nation's newspapers are full of details about what happened on friday. we would like to hear from you your opinions on how america can prevent mass shootings. is it the role of government or society to stop them? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. or join the conversation on facebook by looking for c-span and weighing in. you can also e mail us, journal@c-span.org. here is the first page -- front page of "the hartford current" this morning. "day of grieving." the top headline, along with a list of the victims. the employees, all women. the children, all around the age of 67. this is "the sunday bulletin." "residents gather to find comfor
: chris joining us from philadelphia, democrats' line with representative rick larsen from washington state. caller: thank you, c-span, for what you provide the american people. i find this whole situation ironic. the fiscal cliff scares me personally -- and i think president obama certainly has shown his willingness to compromise whereas the republicans and tea party do not seem to want to do so. this ideology they are sticking to will ruin our economy and i find it hypocritical because their chief criticism of the president during the presidential campaign was his mismanagement of our economy and they are willing to mismanage our economy down the drain on some principal. it does not seem they care about the american people. they care about the part of the american people, the rich, that is what seems like to me and i am sick of it. i used to be republican and i switched party about, i guess eight or 10 years ago. which has something to do with philadelphia politics as well because you cannot have much say in philadelphia politics unless you are democrat but that is beside the point.
sarah kliff, a health care reporter with "the washington post." as we continue our series, we want to take a look at different aspects of what we can expect as we face the january 1 deadline. we want to talk about the said likely the doc fix. many people say you have to understand the doc fix. guest: it is something we have had since about a decade ago. back in 1997, congress set a formula for how to pay doc fares. it worked for about five years until the cost of health care started growing. what we have seen every year is congress passed a temporary pay patch to make up the difference. every year, we get to the end of the year and there is this impending gap. right now if we do not pass it, medicare salaries will go down by 25%. everyone thinks the doc fix is not a good idea and we should fix it permanently. it is something that we face every year. host: if nothing happens next year, the cost is estimated to be $25 billion. over two years, $41 billion. guest: it is expensive and we always have to find a way to pay for it. we are looking for some other cuts that we can make to tota
the department of homeland security program that gives money to recover from a terrorist incident. "washington journal," is next. [video clip] >> we cannot tolerate this any more. these tragedies must end. we must change, to end them. host: president obama at last night's interfaith prayer vigil in newtown, connecticut, speaking to the community hit by friday's elementary school shootings. it's monday, december 17, 2012. the president offered words of solidarity and state and pledged to use the power of the presidency and to prevent future killings. some are asking whether that is an indication on whether he will push for stronger gun control laws. question for you is and should u.s. gun laws change? here are the numbers to call -- you can also find us online. send us a tweet or join the conversation on facebook, or send us an e-mail. our question for you is whether u.s. gun laws should change? here's the headline in "usa today" -- jumping down into the story, it says -- others are exploring the question of gun laws. we will hear some comments from members of congress this morning. congression
. host: that is a shot of the union station in weiss did, d.c. -- in washington, d.c.. we will take a look at politics and the year in foreign policy. we want to hear from you about your political hero. why he or she deserves the honor? your political hero of 2012. you can give us a call this morning. host: you can reach out on social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter.com/cspanwj. we have about 15 comment so far. you can send this e-mail that journal@c-span.org. your political hero for the first 45 minutes. here are some thoughts on facebook and twitter. this is from jonathan espinoza. about 15 comments on facebook already. danny likes bernie sanders. host: just some of the mansion's this morning. entions some of the mansi this morning. you can give us a call. 202-585-3881 for republicans. 202-585-3880 for democrats. 202-585-3882 for independents. also on facebook, facebook.com/cspan. a couple of stories related to the fiscal cliff. from "thew bid frittle bit washington times." this is ron from louisiana. caller: good morning. host: who wish to nominate? -- who would you'll
at 9:15, more about the role of social security. ♪ host: good morning. welcome to "washington journal" on this wednesday, december 12, 2012. negotiations continue over the so-called looming fiscal cliff. yesterday president obama and john boehner spoke by phone. washington post reported however that they are still working on a deal and nothing is locked down yet. we will talk more about the fiscal cliff this morning on "the washington journal." what tax deductions would you give up as part of a solution to the deficit problems? here are the numbers to call. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. you can also find us online. send us a tweet, twitter.com/c- spanwj. find a son facebook and weigh in there. at journal@c- span.org. "the christian science monitor," asked what we would be willing to give up. "americans would be willing to give up the tax deduction for charitable giving over other popular tax breaks." host: let's take a look at the results of this poll. 25% said that they would be willing to give up the charitable giving tax
airlines put together. 50% of people that travel this distance. and between washington d.c. and new york city, amtrak carries twice as many passengers as all airlines come bind. today it carries 75% of inner city travel letters between new york and washington. amtrak has done all this with the threat of funding cuts and privatization especially of the profitable northeast corridor hanging over its head. we know that in other parts of the world privatization of high speed passenger rail has tried and failed to solve the problems it was intended to solve. these plans were almost always preceded by funding cuts, system i can safety and reliability problems caused a great deal of upheaval in the transportation and forced countries to renational lies a system. with that being said, we think that amtrak's long-term next general plan for the northeast corridor provides a temp plate for a public private partnership that is worth discussing. if the partnership does not reduce the public interest or the interest of the brotherhood of lock motive engineers and other skilled workers. further they be
the 2012 presidential campaign. we will be live with your calls, tweets, and e-mails, "washington journal" is next. ♪ host: good morning , president obama is in hawaii this weekend for the christmas holiday with his family. he will join a congressional delegation later today led by harry reid in services in holland -- in honolulu for late senator daniel inouye passed away last week that congress will return monday to continue fiscal negotiations. we will look at the options ahead for the president as the january deadline looms but we want to begin with your comments on another debate front and center in washington following the tragic shooting in newtown, conn. -- that is gun-control. "the washington post" said a bitter fight ahead. the numbers are on your screen. we look at some of the headlines on the sunday morning beginning with "the connecticut post." - you can see the flag remaining at half staff outside one of the churches in newtown, conn. following the burial of 20 children and six women killed about a week and a half ago. this is from the front page of today's "new yor
of u.s. security agents. benghazi, tripoli and washington coordinated effectively with each other on the night of the attacks. the interagency response was timely and appropriate. but there was not enough time for u.s. military forces to have made a difference. having said that, it is not reasonable nor feasible to tether u.s. forces at the ready to respond to protect every high risk post in the world. we have found that there was no immediate tactical warning of the september 11 attacks. if there was a knowledge gap in the intelligence community's en understanding of extremist militias in benghazi -- in this context, increased violence .ailed to com we did not find that any individual u.s. government employee engaged in willful misconduct or knowingly ignored his or her responsibilities. we did conclude that certain state department bureau level senior officials in critical positions of authority and responsibility in washington demonstrate a lack of leadership and management ability a program for senior ranks and their responses to security concerns posed by the special mission.
. on the darkest day of 1990 in washington, d.c., i began my ministry. that is something people don't realize, especially those who attack those who work with the indigent or support for the struggling -- or the poor. when i was back in d.c., we had dan and bob and they sat in an irish bar around the corner and worked out the tax bill in 1987, i believe the year was. that's the kind of leadership the article was just talking about. instead of the people that call up and paris at the propaganda, we really have to be practical. -- that parrot the propaganda. a house divided cannot stand. let me give my personal example. i live on $6.66 a day. that is food stamps. that is for single adults. i live on social security, $774 a month. i am trying to go back to cornell to do sustainable energy. we are in a double down on reaganomics in despite. jimmy carter had great inflation because for five years we were a peaceful country again. then reagan put us back into the largest military buildup in peacetime. i think that's what we ought to do is realize that did not work, just like some of the new deal st
. and in -- the next step is for them to send it to six different places in washington, d.c., but the main thing is they send a record of this to the senate. the senate than tallies them, puts them in two mahogany boxes. one box and -- they send it to the house of representatives where they officially open up the boxes and the elopes and at that point, count to see who has won. host: c-span will be covering the meetings in ohio and north carolina and coverage starts at noon eastern time with the ohio electoral college. 53rd meeting in columbus. you can watch the proceedings live from the ohio statehouse senate chamber on c-span 3. we will also be watching north carolina as its electoral college meets and it is all on our website, c-span.org. go there to find out more. james thurber, does anything unexpected happen when electoral college day occurs? we saw the voting process in november. are electoral college delegates committed? can anything different happen? guest: yes, something different can happen. in 24 states they are required to vote the ticket that they are running on, these electors. so
. -- allyson schwartz. + commodore of bills, phone calls, and tweets. "washington journal" live at 7:00 eastern on c-span. >> one of the things that did surprise me a little, i did not conduct a nationwide survey of gun owners, but among people with gun -- guns the guys start with is very different. owner realizes when he has a gun it is a huge responsibility. if you use the weapon irresponsible plea -- irresponsibly, you could cause yourself trouble off, death even to people that you did not intend to do harm to. it makes you very careful. or it should make you very careful. for most people it does. it would make people more careful if they all had to pass some kind of a test before they get a license. you did not always have to with a gun in many localities. >> craig whitney on the history of gun ownership and gun control in america. and from living with guns, a liberal pays for the second amendment. saturday night at 10:00 eastern. part of four days of non-fiction books and authors through christmas days. as the electoral college met monday, we spoke with a social studies teacher at pioneer
that in washington and that those programs are a huge part of the conversation. host: democrats are saying it is off the table. guest: there are other changes they might be ok with. means testing in medicare which results in those who earn more pay more for their medicare premium. that is one proposal that democrats have begun more comfortable with. there are other changes they might be more comfortable with. host: ron has this suggestion from our twitter page. guest: that is a term we heard. when the cut health care, someone will be bearing the cut.t of that kin that is similar to the concept of those care organizations. they also include quality metrics as part of the contract, where they look at people's outcomes. one way to prevent against the u.s. skimping on care. host: this from sasha -- guest: that is one proposal that gets floated by democrats. medicare part d bargains for drugs. i do not know -- i do not think it would be a cure all, the one proposal that would fix everything. democrats think it would reduce the cost of medicare. host: is there a plan b? guest: we have seen them as the jan
would help the federal regime. >> they look to washington over the next few years and see that the ideas are not working. they're dragging us down. when washington hits a wall, which we know they will, the friends of freedom here in south carolina and all over the country are going to be ready, not with political ideas but with american ideas, ideas that we know are working and can point to and show that they're working for 100% of americans. that's what i'm going to be doing the next few years. i'm not getting out of the fight. i'm raising my game. i know that i have got a partner now in tim scott as well as lindsey graham and governor haley and all of you that are here today. i am so grateful for the opportunity to serve. i promise you and i'm going to keep serving and fighting in the same way that you have seen in the past. thank you. [applause] >> and i can tell you that one of the things as i travel across the country, everyone always wants to know how in the world we got the best federal delegation in the country. all i tell them is that south carolina is blessed. we
to push without delay. this is not some washington commission. this is not something where folks are going to be studying the issue for six months and publishing a report that gets read and then pushed aside. this is a team that has a very specific task, to pull together real reforms right now. i asked joe to lead this effort in part because he wrote the 1994 crime bill that helped law enforcement bring down the rate of violent crime in this country. that plan -- that bill also included the assault weapons ban that was publicly supported at the time by former presidents including ronald reagan. the good news is there's already a growing consensus for us to build from. a majority of americans support banning the sale of military- style assault weapons. a majority of americans support banning the sale of high- capacity ammunition clips. a majority of americans support laws requiring background checks before all gun purchases, so that criminals can't take advantage of legal loopholes to buy a gun from somebody who won't take the responsibility of doing a background check at all. i urge the ne
a hand. [applause] since he came to washington with president obama in 2009, he has been a forward thinking and caring supporter of the district. to the teachers and principals of this city in this country. he has helped secure millions of dollars in funding. they helped shape innovative policies, all across the country. he is a true leader, not just in time for celebration, but in times of tragedy and sorrow. yesterday, he attended the funeral of the principle of sandy hook elementary school that lost her life protecting the children of the school. ladies and gentlemen, i am proud, thankful, and privileged to introduce arne duncan. [applause] >> i want to thank the children for their fantastic support. please give a round of applause for the work she is doing. [applause] i think she is an amazing leader, and d.c. has come a long way and has a long way to go. with her passion in her heart, she is leading the charge. this is a bittersweet day. i think it is so important on days like this and every day, that we listen to our children. savor their innocence and applaud their unquencha
a hunting trip. but ron, he said, you go back to washington and you get your colleagues to do something about the assault weapons and the extended clips and that is what i'm here to do along with my colleagues and we look forward to reaching a cross the aisle and having a similar dwarfing of republican members of -- gathering of republican members of congress to take care of this problem once and for all. >> i want to thank you for your outstanding leadership on this matter. i'm a discharged veteran who earned an expert marksmanship medal while i was in the service. i'm also the parent of a son murdered on the south side of the city of chicago. and i am a pastor of my church. i am here to support hr 308. the large capacity ammunition device act which i have been a co-sponsor of since march of last year. hearing reports that there are 264,000 -- rifles manufactured each year in the u.s. and of those a 5,443 are exported overseas and 248,000 are used right here in the u.s. a bitter irony that we are confronted with at sandy hook is that the firearm industry's association their headquarter
's washington office. she's always been on the cutting edge of things that really matter. let me start off by saying i do not think there is an anti- innovation caucus. i do not think there is anybody who is opposed to innovation. it is a little bit like apple pie or rg3. let me ask you all to describe what we really mean by innovation. what are the two or three priorities we ought to really be talking about? glenn? >> let's start on that side. >> i thought you'd start on that side. >> i go to my right first. >> there are three types of innovation. one is scientific innovation that allows the second innovation which is the technology innovation, to take the underlying discovery and commercialize its, turning it into a product that can be used for consumer customers. what is equally important is how you can then take a discovery, it turned into a technology, and you can deliver it in a way that allows you to build a business that gets you a margin that can support the business. basic science innovation, technology innovations, and business model innovations are the ones we think of. google
those extra five. they are crucial and have to be sent to washington post case for archives and congress and everywhere else -- posthaste for our cars and congress and everyone else. thank you very much to everyone. i hope you have enjoyed yourself, making history, as we have. >> today the 18 members of ohio 's electro college pass their votes for president barack obama -- now ohio possible electoral college -- of ohio's elecroral college passed their votes for president barack obama. courtesy of the ohio channel, this is 40 minutes. >> this is the 53rd meeting of the ohio electoral college. i would like to thank you for coming and welcome you to these procedures. i would like all who are gathered here today to stand for a moment of silent prayer or reflection for the victims, their families and our country as we mourn the deaths of the children and school officials in newtown, connecticut. >> thank you. to lead us through the taiex thank you. to lead us through the preliminary matters and to provide us with a welcoming address, i would like to pass the gavel to congresswoman elect, joyc
time. that does it for today's "washington journal." will be back tomorrow. the live coverage of the house of representatives live on c- span. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. the chair lays before the house a communication from the speaker. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., december 18, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable nan s. hayworth to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the house will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. i have been directed by the house -- sflat that the house that the senate has passed a bill in which the concurrence of the house is requested. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other t
. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., december 19, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable daniel webster to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will receive a message. the messenger: mr. speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the senate has agreed to s. res. 624, relative to the death of the honorable daniel k. inouye, senator from the state of ohio. -- hawaii. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip each, to five minutes but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gent
this morning on "washington journal." guest: this is a recession between christmas and new year's. i do not know. maybe they should finish their work. you will see some push in the next few days to get a small deal done. viewers are fan of the process. anything that gets done needs to be done quickly before new year's to be signed into law. today is the 27. and so you have a few days left for lawmakers to make a deal. the president's should land at some point. there is a 5 hour time difference. they have to figure out something. it seems likely will go over the cliff. it has been looking like that before the holiday, but certainly now, particularly if you remember for congress broke for the christmas break, speaker raynor was not able to get the backup plan through his caucus, so there was no pressure on democrats to try to counter that immediately. senate democrats saying we passed a bill that raises tax rates on incomes over $250,000, we ran on this and this is what we are offering. house republicans were saying, no, we want to negotiate something, figure it out and send it to us. som
in washington on dealing with our economy and national debt and the eerie silence in congress as the list of horrific dwb gun crimes grows by the day. i'm encouraged by seralf my colleagues who have spoken out today. drad ition traddation -- traditionally they've been the side of those who opposed any limitation on firearms but they believe after newtown, connecticut, we have to reopen that conversation in a good faith effort to find common ground. too many colleagues shrug their shoulders when vot come to the floor for a vote. they feel duty bound to vote right on every scorecard issue. my wife and i grew up in downstate illinois with families of hunters. we know the rite of passage when a father takes his son or daughter out hunting the first time. i know fun of watching the sun come up on a duck blind and aring a seasoned hunter calling them over the water. the hunters i know are good people. they le their sport and they hate those who misuse firearms to tryst and -- terrorize and kill. we need these hunters to join with americans who never owned or used a gun to establish a reasonable
, it is not only vote on the ground, this is an understanding in washington why many people are here. you talk about helping syria. it is basically getting enough help, either of the aid -- enough aid to help those that have been fighting for over a year. there are many commanders that have been proven to be a very trusted people. i really do not know how much this administration tried to find the good people, because when you talk to the officials there, how do you know who was good and bad? if you start trying to find your man now, you are probably too late already. this is my last point, i personally know a couple of people who have been living in the u.s. for 20-30 years and have been financing and fighting themselves. at least they could be easy to fund, but unfortunately they always complain they could not get allegiance from the administration. >> your answer is the u.s. government should provide more support to the insurgency? he could definitely. >> in the form of? >> heavy army. >> in terms of recommendations for the administration, they need to understand time is not on their side.
been with the ministry before i was a deputy. >> here in washington you are known as mr. anne applebaum. >> i am proud to be married to anne. >> seven years ago. >> he looks so young. >> does he look that young today? >> he looks wonderful. >> what does that mean that he is now a minister of poland? how does that figure into your interested? >> it does not figure in directly. i have a background in knowledge i would not have otherwise. he does not influence me in a direct way. he is not sitting with me in the archives while i am looking of what happened to the hon. film director in 1947 -- while i am looking at what happened to the hungarian film director in 1947. having this connection gives me some empathy and what happened there. >> what are the residuals from world war ii two today in eastern europe? anything? >> one of the things that happened since 1989 is the region we used to call eastern europe has become very differentiated. these countries no longer have anything in common with one another, except a common memory of communist occupation. poland is as different as greece is fr
amendment rights of the constitution. host: there is this headline in "the washington post" this morning. host: does that need to be looked at as well? guest: we had much more of a country that still restricted alcohol after prohibition four decades ago. that is one reason atf has fewer agents. canada tried to register the firearms and tried for over 10 years and finally dropped it. that didn't work out. i am not saying we shouldn't keep better records. fbi and other agencies should look at the background of everyone. i am not an expert in all these areas. having this debate where everybody blames the gun and everybody says it is the people involved on the other side, that is too simplistic. we have to put everything on the table. we can debate everything. we should debate our mental health situation. connecticut does not allow forced medication for people that are mentally ill. and our gun-free zone policy, which obviously has not worked. host: "the washington post" also notes -- host: joe from maryland. caller: my name is joe and i'm watching this on the news and everything. i make vie
colleague from washington, mr. reichert, who knows firsthand the power of d.n.a. evidence from his years as a sheriff. and finally and most importantly, katie's family and her mother. she has endured every parent's worst nightmare. her determination and dedication are inspiring and when katie's law is signed into law, and it will be, it will be a testament to her work and her love for her daughter. mr. speaker, i urge the house to pass katie's law and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. smith: mr. speaker, i yield four minutes to the gentleman from new mexico, mr. pearce. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from new mexico is recognized for four minutes. mr. pearce: i thank the gentleman from texas for yielding and i thank the gentleman from california, mr. schiff, for his leadership on this. i rise in strong support of h.r. 6014 today. katie sepich, her picture her here, tells us a lot. she was fun-loving, vibrant, outgoing. she was a leader in our age group. she made things happen. kati
. host: sarah kliff covers health care for "the washington post." thank you for joining us. we take a look at america by the numbers and what america looks like by the year 2016. jennifer ortman and william frey here to talk about america by the numbers. we are back in a moment. >> president obama in the reaction to the connecticut shootings. later, the impacts of the so- called fiscal cliff on tax filings. >> president obama on the school shooting in connecticut. he said the time is not to take meaningful action. he was notified by homeland security advisor john brennan. he ordered flags lowered to half staff. this is about 5 minutes. >> i spoke with governor malloy and fbi director muller. i offered governor malloy my condolences on behalf of the nation and made it clear he will have every resource he needs to investigate this crime, care for theirctimw and families. we have endured too many of these tragedies. each time i learned the news, i react not as a president but as anybody else would, as a parent. that was true today. there is not a parent in america who does not feel the
shootings, indicating they plan to hold a major news conference in the washington area this friday. we'll keep you posted on that. conversation from this morning's "washington journal" next, as we wait for the house to gavel in around 6:00 p.m. eastern for a series of four votes on the issues of the connecticut shooting and gun control from this morning. host: what do you make of that? guest: we've been this way before. in 1994, president clinton signed an assault weapons ban into law. it expired in 2004. so we have 10 years of experience of what that ban did. and frankly, a university of pennsylvania study that looked comprehensively at all of that said that while there was some slight decrease in the use of assault weapons, it did nothing for overall gun violence. assault weapons, semiautomatics, used between 2% and 8% of crimes and instead the gun ban did nothing to reduce the overall level of gun violence in this country. look, i mean, this is a very tragic situation. it's a very emotional one. at least an emotional issue -- emotional an issue as the death penalty or abortion. we h
now. why do i bring this up? is there anybody in washington, d.c. who is talking about cutting tax rates? and the answer is no. there's really not. there's not one person in this chamber who comes to the floor and talks about cutting tax rates. we might like to but we're in a tough economic crisis right now and folks are concerned about the revenue side of the equation. what folks are talking about, though, is not raising tax rates. for some reason, for reasons that i can't understand, mr. speaker, the president has gotten wrapped around the axle on an insistence that actual rates go up. speaker john boehner offered him revenue he said if you just want the money, we'll find a way to get money through taxes, it doesn't have to be through higher rates, we can do it through eliminating loopholes and exemses, broadening the base. the president said i want higher rates. when we're not talking about higher rate fless white house, mr. speaker, we're talking about fairness. i've got to tell you, mr. speaker, dadgummit, you and i are freshmen in this body, we came with the largest freshmen
to be with us. it's nice to close the doors from the rest of washington and the fiscal cliff debate for a little while and talk about fiscal challenges elsewhere. whether it's a good news or bad news, at least it gives us an opportunity to talk about something a little bit different than the news of the day in this final two weeks, i think, before hopefully congress finds an opportunity to either avoid or move or solve some of the fiscal cliff issues and fiscal challenges that we face. and thank you for dick gravich and the work of the panel and the commission he co--led. there are copies of that report that were available when you came in. it's an excellent document that i really encourage everyone to take a close read. it's filled with good analytics in terms of what's going on on the state level. to help us understand. and i fully agree, dick, with your comments earlier about the disconnect. here in washington, obviously, we're facing our own serious challenges. and sometimes those challenges seem so overwhelming that the notion of adding in the layer of complexity to think about the conseque
farmington district, you've done it well. lorraine of washington county, pennsylvania, then aged 73, suffered injuries so severe from a car accident that she will never fully recover. after the accident, she underwent a difficult surgery. she contracted mrsa. sadly, lorraine's condition has worsened and she now suffers from dementia and now must receive 24/7 carat a nursing home. the physical -- care at a nursing home. the physical pain mirrors the emotional care. she lost her husband and then last year her only child passed away. lorraine's story is heartbreaking and tragic and it's depressing to learn that medicare is working against lorraine's interest. mountain fall of 2010, lorraine's family and the automobile insurer for the other driver in the accident reached a monetary settlement. the insurer agreed to pay her medical bills and she would collect damages. first, her health insurer, medicare, had to be repaid. but the center for medicare and medicaid will not tell the auto insurer how much is owed to the medicare trust fund. they want to give her a settlement but their bureaucracy is
aggressive, more proactive measures. mean "the washington post," which is not exactly a right wing think tank, said recently, quote, right now the critics are starting to look pretty prescient. affordable possession of one's own home is the american dream. government support excessive borrowing has turned into a national nightmare, close quote. and the focus of that editorial was, we still haven't fundamentally reformed that, including at f.h.a. so i hope we start getting on that track starting today. thank you, mr. chairman. >> senator menendez. >> thank you very much. i'll be brief. i look forward to hearing the secretary's response on how f.h.a. balances the goals of remaining self-sufficient without taxpayer funds, but also helping what is still a fragile housing market in ensuring first-time home buyers can get credit. there is a clear case to be made in my mind that but for f.h.a. in the midst of this housing crisis, we would have a far greater crisis on our hands. and so wreck siling -- reconciling the fiduciary responsibilities here to the taxpayers as well as the mission to people of
today where washington once sat, he's have that lincoln cud might be equal value of you and me. tom jefferson, who even thinks a black man should be free? that feather-headed fool would tell you that maybe a president might lie in this new baby. in this squawker, born without a rag, to hide himself, good god it makes me gag. this human spawn, born for the world to wipe its feet upon, a few years hence but now he's more helpless than the litter of a sow and oh, well. send the women folks to see nance. poor little devil. born without a chance. who became one of the greatest presidents we ever had. who passed the emancipation proclamation and made everybody free. but he didn't have a chance. then i want to say to my colleagues one more thing. and then i'll stop. and this is when you speak on the floor and i hope my colleagues will get a chance to read this because it's really important. you drop a pebble in the water, just a splash and it is gone. but there's half a hundred ripples circling on and on and on. spreading, spreading from the center, flowing on out to the sea, and there's n
tonight i yield whatever time she might want to take to our colleague from the great state of washington -- hawaii. ms. hanabusa: thank you very much to the gentleman from california. i'm here to honor a state which is unique and as special as the person i honor. the person i rise to honor is daniel k. inouye. a person who cannot be described by a single adjective. a person whose accomplishments would cause you to pause and say, is this one person? is this one man? a person was awarded the greatest honor anyone who serves in the military can achieve, the congressional medal of honor. but it was an honor about 55 years late. from a country that questioned his loyalty due to the fact that he was an american of japanese ancestry. a person who could not get a hair cut after being severely wounded and giving -- and given his arm in battle because he looked like the enemy. a person who insisted that instead of being bitter he would dedicate his life to doing all he can to right social inequities and description of all kinds -- discrimination of all kinds. to do this he became part of the democ
in "the washington post" today, it was very striking to note that for the first time when people have been askedhis question after -- and they have been asked it after a series of acts of mass violence, columbine, virginia tech, et cetera, aurora, do you think that this was an isolated act or does it say something about more troubling conditions in our society? i'm paraphrasing. for the first time. every other time people said it was an isolated act of a madman or mad people. this time they said it reflects a deeper problem in our society, and i believe what causes that change is that 20 of the victims in newtown, connecticut, were young children, and there is not only a heartbreak across our country about this, not only anger, but i think there is guilt, and we all ought to feel guilty because as a society what the attacks in newtown said to us is that we have failed to fulfill what would seem to be our most natural, natural law, if you will, responsibility, which is to protect the safety and lives of our children. so i hope we will act. there will be no better tribute, no better source o
. americans have a right to know the washington money -- the money washington tension there is well spent. our duty on the oversight and government reform committee is to protect these rights. our solemn responsibility is to hold the government accountable to the taxpayer. it is our job to work tirelessly in partnership with citizen watchdogs to deliver the fax to the american people and bring general reform to bureaucracy. our committee's resources are limited, in one area, we have focused for more than six years. and that is taking drugs and dangerous substances out of professional sports. we do some -- we do so for a bipartisan basis. we do so because what professional sports do is what collegiate sports do and it is what children aspire to do. we cannot take professional sports a in isolation, because ultimately it trickles down to the youngest. when we began our work on a bipartisan basis on steroids in baseball, steroids have become common at the high-school level. today i believe it is dramatically reduced but not eliminated. it in play last season. we are now finishing this season, and
. and the more fair we are here in washington, you make more, you pay more. you make less you pay less. and i'm one of those that likes two deductions. one for charitable giving and the other for the mortgage interest dedux. we can negotiate over numbers. that's not a problem. we can compromise, we can reach an agreement, a compromise over numbers. but let's don't compromise on principle that is so basic, simply says, if you make more you pay more. it's an easy concept. you make more you pay more. you make less you pay less. that's fair. and for heaven's sake, let's do this and let's take that obamacare burden off the working poor in america that are going to get socked with that tax. and we were told for so long, if we don't do something, there will be 30 million, maybe 20 million, 30 million people in america who won't have insurance. and then we get to the bottom of it, we find out, well, now we're going to have lots of people pay lots more taxes and we're still -- oh, and we're gutting medicare in obamacare, we're gutting it $716 billion, so the seniors will have less health care. oh, i k
are looking at that now. we're trying to figure out what the cost would be. money will be tight in washington trying to come up with something, but it looks cost-effective. >> thank you very much. let the record show that you always been so generous with giving me all the time of want. nobody else ever does that. >> if you would like to stay for another round of questions, we will be glad. >> thank you. >> let me just ask a couple of questions that occurred to me. it seems to me we have three different issues and maybe more than three. this idea of putting a five-year limit on these credits, i think the mindset that leads to that, at least with regard to some of these incentives, is that we are trying to support new technologies or emerging technologies or early stage technologies, and we want to support them but we won to be able to progress to a point where they can stand on their own after a certain time and compete in the marketplace. so that makes sense to have a tax credit or provision to encourage the use of that technology and in phase-in out. it seems to me much of the other things w
's washington journal. this >> "washington journal" continues. host: lawrence yun is the chief economist and senior vice president for the national association of realtors. how would you assess the housing markets today? guest: thanks for inviting me, peter. housing market has turned for the better in 2012. the home sales overall look to be about 10% better this year versus last. home prices on average are up about 5%. in some parts of the country, it's up better than 20%. you are seeing places like las vegas and miami where it's about a 10% gain. there's local market variation, but overall the housing market is recovering. host: if the u.s. government and american taxpayers go over the so called "fiscal cliff" what do you foresee for? the for? guest: the fiscal cliff is going to shave off about 4% of gdp, so that the national economic growth. currently is growing about 2%. you can do very simple mathematics. and we are back in a recession. we can anticipate 1 million or 2 million net job losses in 2013. it will be difficult for the housing market to continue its momentum without jobs. s
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